Our Future Valley
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The future of the Sturgeon Valley

On September 14, 2021, Sturgeon County Council gave final approval to three bylaws that establish the future direction for the Sturgeon Valley area.

Known as the Our Future Valley project, the three bylaws include amendments to the County’s Municipal Development Plan, the Sturgeon Valley Core Area Structure Plan (ASP), and a new Sturgeon Valley South Area Structure Plan.

“By working with our residents, regional partners, and investors, we have been able to create a plan that respects existing development and identifies new opportunities for the Sturgeon Valley,” said Sturgeon County Mayor Alanna Hnatiw. “And while this is the end of one process, it is also the beginning of another process that will include more specific standards and public consideration of specific neighbourhood plans. We look forward continuing to work with everyone in the Valley to help realize this new vision.”

The updated planning documents outline areas for new residential development, future infrastructure and transportation requirements, as well as new commercial and industrial employment areas. Within each area, policies have been included that serve to respect existing residential and environmentally sensitive areas. They also include specific requirements that development density be transitioned or buffered between existing and future neighbourhoods.

The plans also reflect residents’ desire for more trails and access to greenspaces, while maintaining the unique heritage of the area. They further establish principles to honour what was heard during the consultation process, adhere to Edmonton Metropolitan Region Board (EMRB) policies on development density and other factors, and provide a clear and transparent planning pathway for land developers.

Moving to the implementation phase, the County will need to update a number of technical documents such as the the Land Use Bylaw and the general municipal servicing standards to reflect the regulations and design standards needed for higher density development. Engagement activities will take place to solicit input from developers, landowners, and residents. 

The ‘What’s Next’ chart below provides information on where the project is at, and what opportunities are available for public participation and input. 

Questions, comments, concerns?

If you have any questions about the Sturgeon Valley project please let us know at ourvalley@sturgeoncounty.ca.

Our Future Valley: What's Next

Complete

Step 1
Confirm

In-Progress

Step 2
Research

Not-Started

Step 3
Engagement

Not-Started

Step 4
Reporting

Not-Started

Step 5
Completion

 

  • Update Council on project timelines and deliverables.
  • Organize cross-departmental team.

 

Status: Complete Started: September 2021 | Completion: November 2021


  • Research best practises for high density residential development in the region and beyond.
  • Site tour of regional high-density developments.
  • Debrief findings on land use bylaw recommendations based on research.
  • Debrief findings on municipal servicing standards recommendation for high density development based on research.

Status: In-Progress Started: November 2021 | Completion: December 2021


  • Review findings with internal and external stakeholders.

Status: Not-Started Start: January 2022 | Completion: January 2022


  • Development of recommendations report
  • Report findings and recommendations.

Status: Not-Started Start: December 2022 | Completion: January 2022


  • Approval of Land Use Bylaw amendments
  • Approval of supplementary general municipal servicing standards for the Valley

Status: Not-Started Start: February 2022 | Completion: March 2022


Find out more

  • EMRB Growth Plan
    Land use and density directly impact the built environment, character, pace of development, municipal revenue streams, and affordability of a neighbourhood. The 2010 Capital Region Growth Plan designated the entire Sturgeon Valley plan area as Cluster Country Residential with a density target of 2 dwelling units per gross hectare. As per the 2010 Growth Plan, the area directly south and southwest of the Sturgeon Valley plan area required a target residential density of between 30 and 45 dwelling units per net residential hectare (du/nrha).
     
  • Sturgeon Valley Special Study Area Policies
     
  • Sturgeon Valley Growth Framework
     
  • St. Albert Annexation
    After nearly three years since the formation of the Annexation Negotiating Sub-Committee, St. Albert City Council and Sturgeon County Council approved the negotiated annexation agreement on September 21 and September 22 2020, respectively. St. Albert City Council also gave direction to its administration to make an application to the Municipal Government Board (MGB).
     
  • Goodridge Corners Neighbourhood Area Structure Plan
    The Goodridge Corners Neighbourhood Area Structure Plan was adopted by Edmonton City Council in 2014 and has an overall density of approximately 42 du/nrha. Discussions regarding potential sale of City of Edmonton owned land in Goodridge Corners was initiated at the February 24, 2020 City of Edmonton Executive Committee Meeting. Plan amendments to the Goodridge Corners NASP were then initiated at the March 9, 2020 City of Edmonton Council meeting.
     
  • Commercial Development Analysis
    In August 2019, Sturgeon County Economic Development retained Vancouver based MXD Development Strategists Ltd. (MXD) to prepare a Commercial Development Analysis. Work was completed in early 2020.
     
  • 127th Street Functional Planning Study
    In August 2012, Sturgeon County engaged ISL to carry out a Functional Planning Study for future 127 Street. The study identifies the preferred option for the alignment of 127 Street from the City of Edmonton boundaries near Anthony Henday all the way to City of St. Albert boundaries near Highway 2. The preferred option for the alignment of 127 street is identified on the map in pink.
     
  • Understanding Density Series
    The Understanding Density Series assists in highlighting the realities of density. When considering growth, density targets must be appropriate to allow for a variety of housing products that appeal to the market. While we aspire to achieve higher density as community builders, our densification targets need to be thoughtfully considered to fully understand their impacts.
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